Archive for March, 2012

LGBTQ Youth

After viewing these heartbreaking statistics you will come to understand why projects like It Gets Better is so important.  All illustrated data is from The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth.

It Does Get Better [Infographic]

Hopefully you will agree after browsing these “Gay Happy Facts.”  Help support the project by going to http://www.itgetsbetter.org/ and signing the pledge of support, and if you are in the Simmons Community, visit www.simmons.edu/itgetsbetter to learn about how to get involved.

IGB

SA Women Talk Tech: Rosa Parks, The power of women standing up for what they believe in

Rosa ParksEveryone knows what happened after Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama bus in December of 1955, but what is less well known is the real reason why, and what lead up to that decisive moment.

Twelve years prior to the bus boycott, in 1943, Rosa Parks became active in the civil right movement as a member of the local NAACP chapter and secretary to the president of the organization. In this same year, Rosa experienced her first confrontation with a bus driver when she was told to exit the front of the bus in the rain and re-enter through the back of the bus. As she was doing so, she dropped her purse and sat for a minute to pick it up. This so enraged the bus driver that he drove off and left her standing in the rain outside of the bus. Rosa knew this treatment was unfair, but felt there was little she could do.

In 1944 Rosa experienced her first taste of equality when working at Maxwell Air Force Base because the base was federal property and secretion was not permitted. After leaving the base, Rosa took a job working for a couple who sponsored her attendance at Highlander Folk School, a place where she was further educated about racial equality and the rights of workers. Her confidence grew.

In 1955, after coming back to Montgomery, she took a job at a local department store as a seamstress. On her way back from work on day she sat down in the first row of middle section of the bus, behind the section reserved for whites. By a strange coincidence, the same bus driver who had thrown her off 13 years ago was driving the bus that day. When all of the seats reserved for whites filled up, he moved the sign back and demanded that Rosa and three others give up their seats. Rosa refused.People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

Rosa shared the real motivation behind her decision in her biography:
“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in. I knew someone had to take the first step and I made up my mind not to move. Our mistreatment was just not right, and I was tired of it.”

Rosa parks was not an accidental activist, she was an intentional activist. She made a conscious decision to take a stand. Subsequently, Jo Ann Robinson, organizer and member of the Women’s Political Council stayed up all night mimeographing over 35,000 copies of a flyer announcing a boycott of the buses. This group was the first to officially endorse and advertise the boycott. They started the work that spread through churches and newspapers to coordinate 40,000 people in only 2 days.

While the bus boycott would last 381 days before Alabama’s segregation laws would be ruled unconstitutional, Rosa’s steadfast commitment to the cause through difficult times inspired the movement.

What happens when one woman stands up for the rights of many? What happens when women come together and organize around a cause? Rosa’s story is a reminder of the power of one woman’s voice, and the amplified power of a community of women coming together.   Imagine how quickly our voices can spread when you have the internet as a tool.  How will you use the tools you have at your disposal to make sure your voice is heard?  Share Rosa’s story and be inspired by her strength.  I know I am.

Resources:
http://www.rosaparksfacts.com
“Parks Recalls Bus Boycott, Excerpts from an interview with Lynn Neary”, National Public Radio, 1992, linked at Civil Rights Icon Rosa Parks Dies, NPR, October 25, 2005. Retrieved July 4, 2008.

Originally posted on Student Affairs Women Talk Tech 3/1/12

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