Archive for the ‘SA women talk tech’ Category

SA Women Talk Tech: Rosa Parks, The power of women standing up for what they believe in

Rosa ParksEveryone knows what happened after Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery Alabama bus in December of 1955, but what is less well known is the real reason why, and what lead up to that decisive moment.

Twelve years prior to the bus boycott, in 1943, Rosa Parks became active in the civil right movement as a member of the local NAACP chapter and secretary to the president of the organization. In this same year, Rosa experienced her first confrontation with a bus driver when she was told to exit the front of the bus in the rain and re-enter through the back of the bus. As she was doing so, she dropped her purse and sat for a minute to pick it up. This so enraged the bus driver that he drove off and left her standing in the rain outside of the bus. Rosa knew this treatment was unfair, but felt there was little she could do.

In 1944 Rosa experienced her first taste of equality when working at Maxwell Air Force Base because the base was federal property and secretion was not permitted. After leaving the base, Rosa took a job working for a couple who sponsored her attendance at Highlander Folk School, a place where she was further educated about racial equality and the rights of workers. Her confidence grew.

In 1955, after coming back to Montgomery, she took a job at a local department store as a seamstress. On her way back from work on day she sat down in the first row of middle section of the bus, behind the section reserved for whites. By a strange coincidence, the same bus driver who had thrown her off 13 years ago was driving the bus that day. When all of the seats reserved for whites filled up, he moved the sign back and demanded that Rosa and three others give up their seats. Rosa refused.People always say that I didn't give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn't true. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

Rosa shared the real motivation behind her decision in her biography:
“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in. I knew someone had to take the first step and I made up my mind not to move. Our mistreatment was just not right, and I was tired of it.”

Rosa parks was not an accidental activist, she was an intentional activist. She made a conscious decision to take a stand. Subsequently, Jo Ann Robinson, organizer and member of the Women’s Political Council stayed up all night mimeographing over 35,000 copies of a flyer announcing a boycott of the buses. This group was the first to officially endorse and advertise the boycott. They started the work that spread through churches and newspapers to coordinate 40,000 people in only 2 days.

While the bus boycott would last 381 days before Alabama’s segregation laws would be ruled unconstitutional, Rosa’s steadfast commitment to the cause through difficult times inspired the movement.

What happens when one woman stands up for the rights of many? What happens when women come together and organize around a cause? Rosa’s story is a reminder of the power of one woman’s voice, and the amplified power of a community of women coming together.   Imagine how quickly our voices can spread when you have the internet as a tool.  How will you use the tools you have at your disposal to make sure your voice is heard?  Share Rosa’s story and be inspired by her strength.  I know I am.

Resources:
http://www.rosaparksfacts.com
“Parks Recalls Bus Boycott, Excerpts from an interview with Lynn Neary”, National Public Radio, 1992, linked at Civil Rights Icon Rosa Parks Dies, NPR, October 25, 2005. Retrieved July 4, 2008.

Originally posted on Student Affairs Women Talk Tech 3/1/12

SA Women Talk Tech: App Highlights, Pinterest, Instagram, & Flipboard

With given the task of highlighting apps, my choices actually were fairly easy.  As I suspect many of you can relate, I have downloaded more apps for my smartphone/tablet than I can count, but I find myself only going back to about 10 on a regular basis.  Below are some of the winners, the applications that make my life easier in some way, or feed my hobbies.

Pinterest It (ios)

I am a newbie to this social networking phenomenon, however, after one session at a conference called “Pinterest for organizers” I was hooked.  I’ll post more about how we can use this cool new platform very soon, but in the meantime, consider jumping on board one of the fastest growing social network around. Read Kristen Abell’s post on Pinterest or watch the helpful video I found about how Pinterest works (great if you are a visual learner like me).  If after learning more, you will want an invite, so feel free to email Kristen or I at jess.faulk [at] gmail.com!



Apps to support your new Pinterest  habit:
View your account (iphone)
Pin it – add to your boards (iphone/ipad)
Android users feeling left in the cold?  Check out this article about 3rd party Pinterest android apps.

Instagram (ios)

I am a causal user of instagram, but everytime I stumble upon the app I am reminded how much I enjoy using it.  It is a fun way to share moments or cool shots of random things with friends and family, and it can result in some pretty awesome art for your apartment.  If you are interested in getting into the instagram craze, you can download the ios app.

For ios (iphone, ipad, ipod touch)
Apparently there are some rumors of it coming to android soon too!

Flipboard (ios)

My #1 app of choice is for content consumption on my ipad.  I love Flipboard because it is an awesome content curator (like an RSS feed) and gives me easy access to articles from all over the web.  It exposes me to more material than if I was just clicking around on the web, and it is easy to tweet or link to FB directly from the app. Zite (ios) and Google Currents (ios/android) are two alternatives to Flipboard that do basically the same thing.  Below is a video of google current so you can get a sense of the type of app (and because I am feeling guilty about all of the ios apps I am promoting ;)

Originally posted on Student Affairs Women Talk Tech blog 2/24/12

[Infographic] Why SAPros are really superheroes in disguise

#saheroes

Image Credits
Superman: Alex Ross
Lois Lane: Killian Plunkett
SA Team (JLA): Jim Lee, http://www.joinwecanbeheroes.org/
Superhero/Alterego prints: by Danny Haas, http://society6.com/artist/r0gue
Superhero Playing Cards: RedRaspus on Flickr
Origingally posted on Student Affairs Women Talk Tech on 2.7.12

SA Women Talk Tech: Linkage Love

As a techie woman, and curious student affairs professional, I am always looking for free or cheap technology focused professional development opportunities in my city. I am lucky enough to call Boston my home, a city with an abundance of conferences, tweetups, and socials. Over the course of the year, I have attended events such as PodCamp6, A11y Tech Accessibility Unconference, Educators & Entrepreneurs Summit: The Future of Education Technology, NY Internet Week, and MegaTweetup3. At each of these events I always have the opportunity to learn about a new piece of technology that sounds promising. I come home with a pocketful of business cards, file them, and forget about them. I am sure you’ve had a similar experience. It’s not like you meant to forget them, but life just keeps going and you don’t take the time to look into that new piece of tech.

This past weekend, in the process of cleaning up my apartment managed to unearth a stack of cards and notes from the year’s various events and wanted to share some of my favorites with you.

Smarterer
This start up was tabling at one of the conferences to give attendees a look at the future of technology competency. I believe that our students are not as tech savvy as we give them credit for. We often think that students have more experience with programs such as Excel, Photoshop, or Google applications just because they are younger than we are. I find however that our students have a ways to go when it comes to using computer applications in a way that is useful for their organizations and their jobs. This website, still in it’s infancy, has begun to create a platform for testing and sharing technology competency scores. One day we may be posting our Smarterer scores on our resume, but in the meantime, it is a fun site to visit, test yourself, and perhaps even create a test to challenge your student leaders to grow their tech knowledge.

Rapportive

This gem I just learned about tonight from @robbiesamuels while at the the#MegaTweetup. Robbie uses Rapportive to be able to pull in all of the information from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. to help him make connections with all of the people he emails. When you are in your Gmail account and have the program installed, you can see all of a person’s latest tweets and their contact information just by hovering over their name. Once you connect the program with your LinkedIn contacts, you might also discover connections between your friends and co-workers that you didn’t even know existed! Gist is another program that does something very similar. If you are a Gmail user, I suggest you check them out.

myhappypost.com: A social experiment to spread happiness

This project was one that I was introduced to at a street fair. I was talking by a table and asked the question “What makes you happy?” What a great question to ask a stranger I thought. The team that created this project is spreading joy into the communities around the world by asking them to share of what they enjoy in life, making people smile, and passing along the sense of satisfaction from one person to another. On the brick wall across from the table was hundreds of post-it notes from people at the fair that wanted to share. Immediately I thought of what a great project this would be to bring back to my college. Check out the project, and see if the thought of bringing the happiness project to your institution makes you smile :)

 

Does our constant connectedness kill our creativity?

Commuting. Walking. Waiting. We are never alone.  We have angry birds, plants vs. zombies, and facebook to keep us company. Whether we are sitting completely alone in a room, or waiting in a room full of dozens of others, our phones are our pacifiers and our safety net.  If you have 20 minutes until the next bus comes, you don’t fret because you know you have something to occupy your time.  If you are caught in a space with people you don’t know, you don’t have to reach outside of your comfort zone and awkwardly talk to someone else, you just pull out your phone.

I know you have heard it all before.  Pundits tell you to unplug from technology.  Authors write about how it is hurting our ability to get work done.  We feel guilty for being allowing a dependence on our techno gadgets.  It’s easy to rationalize our relationship with technology (and specifically our smart phones) because you see so many others around you with the same approach.

I am no different.  I never leave home without my iphone in my pocket and my ipad in my purse.  However I read an article a while back that planted an idea in my head that has been eating at me.  Does our constant connectedness kill our creativity?

As a techie, your mind probably does the same thing that mine does – instantly defends the stance that constant technological connectedness ENHANCES our creativity.  We share ideas, we build communities, we are exposed to new perspectives!  What could be bad about that?

But consider this; what did you used to do in all of those moments commuting, walking, and waiting before you had a smartphone?  Daydreaming, list making and absorbing information about your surroundings.  You were taking in the world in a different way.  Perhaps it was just to see an exciting new font, a shoe style on the person next to you that reminded you to call your brother, or read a magazine that had an article that spurs your next blog post.  The article I read proposed that without these moments of daydreaming, the unstructured time in our lives not invaded by videogames, facebook, and TV shows, we don’t allow ourselves to make the random connections that become a fully formed thought, which in turn can become an idea that leads to a true creativity.

I am not proposing that we cut all technology out of our lives.  I am certainly not suggesting we throw out our smart phones (my iphone isn’t going anywhere!).  I am simply suggesting that instead of pulling out a smartphone the next time you are on the subway or waiting in line, you consider using those precious minutes in your life to just take in the world around you and see what creative moments it might inspire.

Note: I do want to acknowledge that I am writing this article aimed at the privileged folks in Student Affairs who are able to afford a smartphone and other fancy pieces of tech.  If you are not one of those people, consider my article as a good way to rationalize enjoying this freedom from the smartphone world, and how much more thoughtful you have the potential be without the distraction J

 

Originally posted on the SA Women Talk Tech Blog at: http://wp.me/p17gVe-wc

SA WomenTalkTech: Why SAPros will survive the Zombie Apocalypse #sazombie

Have you ever been watching a zombie movie or TV show and wondered how you would fair if you were stuck in the same situation?  I have often, and have recently come to the conclusion that as student affairs professionals we are better off than the average person when it comes to living in a post-apocalyptic world.  We’ve got the the resources and the experience, because let’s face it, come April we all feel like zombies (@clconzen).

Do you know more SAPro survival skills? Post them on the comments below!  Also, I HIGHLY suggest checking out the Disaster Preparedness Simulation Exercise created by a USF employee in 2009.  Read all about the controversy is caused on the SunSentinel.com.  In that regard, I would like to say that this was created in jest and is in no way associated with the college at which I work.

Below this infographic I have listed all of the great tweets that contributed to the creation of this post.  Thank you to everyone who gave me their ideas!  A enlarged version of the converted H1N1 sign is also posted below.

SAZombies

Contributions:

  • Friday duty nights are nothing compared to nights of the living dead @Clconzen
  • Face it…come April we all feel like zombies @Clconzen
  • SA pros negotiate work/life balance while zombies balance work/undeath balance @Clconzen
  • SA pros running on all cylinders with almost no sleep is just a normal day at work. @ECrumrine
  • We have closets full of snacks and candy for next week’s program & keys to the univ getaway golf @OberBecca
  • We’ll just write a developmental theory that will make their brains explode as they connect to emotion. @Kmagura
  • Hoarding supplies, leading groups of survivors, first aid kits, availability of sporting equipment and board games. @demonsean
  • We certainly WON’T if we do our thing and “meet them where they are” ;) @justcameo
  • ZBSD reference from the unofficial Emergency Planning Document, UF Disaster Preparedness Simulation Exercise (Check out page 5 for the “Infected Co-Worker Dispatch Form”!)

Reuse H1N1 sign to save time and money

ZBSD Sign

Graphic Credits:

Flashlight by Mark A. Hicks, Candy from Clipartheaven.com, Pea shooter from Bryan Lopez, Tired Student from 1photos.com , Undead student & party zombies from JessFaulk, Key from Freepik.com, Golf Cart from Muddy Waters Metal Art , Microphone from WorldPolicy.org , Zombie Twitter Sticker from coolpics.blogspot.com , H1N11 sign from safetysign.com , Brain by BestVector & ZBSD reference by UF staff member

This was  posted on the SAWomenTalkTech blog Friday, December 9, 2011.

SA Women Talk Tech: How do you include your hobbies & passions into your work and everyday life?

This blog prompt inspired me to show you, instead of tell you, about my hobbies and passions.  To use my passions and hobbies in the creation of the post itself.  Yes, it’s a bit meta, but bear with me.  Enjoy a visualization of me: my passions (Graphic Design, Google, Tech, Apple), my hobbies (Biking, Kayaking, Climbing), and what is most important to me (family, friends, learning, and sharing).

My Hobbies and Passions

If you made a visualization of you, what pictures or items would it include?  How would you answer this prompt?

This post originally on 10/31/11 on http://sawomentalktech.com

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